Ruhi

What is the Teaching Blog?

Planning the IPG

This site is designed to share as quickly as possible the teaching stories, lessons learned, and creative initiatives that friends are developing every day in clusters around the country.

Check in regularly to get the hottest news of teaching efforts fresh from the field of action. Or you can search the archives for ideas and suggestions on specific topics – the core activities, collective teaching efforts, and many others – to take your own teaching plans to the next level.

The Five Year Plan is all about a learning environment, so don’t hesitate to post comments or questions on stories you liked, or respond to someone else’s comments. And remember that your experiences could benefit hundreds of friends in their own efforts to advance the Cause, so send in your own stories (and pictures!), insights, and challenges! (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

We hope you enjoy the site and find it useful, and look forward to hearing from all of you.

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Mahendran finds success with Anna's Presentation

Mahendran of Johor Bahru talks to Suraj Chew about the success he has had teaching the Faith following Anna's Presentation model.

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The next step for Ruhi?

Ruhi: Mistaking Correlation for Causation

I’ve been catching up on the Baha’i blogosphere this weekend and I just read Alison’s thought provoking observations on Ruhi.

The thinking behind this all-encompassing Ruhi project appears to me like a cargo-cult mentality. Boiled down, it says: “If we build it, they will come”. In the late 19th century, peoples in the Pacific Islands believed that if they built structures associated with cargo, this would lead to cargo magically turning up. Wiki says: “The most famous examples of Cargo Cult behavior have been the airstrips, airports, and radios made out of coconuts and straw. The cult members built them in the belief that the structures would attract transport aircraft full of cargo. Believers stage ‘drills’ and ‘marches’ with twigs for rifles and military-style insignia and ‘USA’ painted on their bodies to make them look like soldiers.” You see, the cult members had no idea how cargo was actually made and transported to their islands. Instead, they associated its appearance with the appearance of spiritual beings with magical equipment.

I chuckled a bit reading that because Alison is an excellent writer and it made me see in my mind’s eye little jungle men marching in faux-uniforms pretending to be air traffic controllers or soldiers and what-not.

The fallacy that induced the cargo-cults is mistaking correlation for causation. That is, because A happened and then B happened… A must have caused B. So if we repeat A, we should get result B.

Or in simpler terms, because ice cream sales go up when it is hot and sunny, let's sell more ice cream, because then we should have a warm, sunny day.

Full story...

Ruhi: Mistaking Correlation for Causation

I’ve been catching up on the Baha’i blogosphere this weekend and I just read Alison’s thought provoking observations on Ruhi.

The thinking behind this all-encompassing Ruhi project appears to me like a cargo-cult mentality. Boiled down, it says: “If we build it, they will come”. In the late 19th century, peoples in the Pacific Islands believed that if they built structures associated with cargo, this would lead to cargo magically turning up. Wiki says: “The most famous examples of Cargo Cult behavior have been the airstrips, airports, and radios made out of coconuts and straw. The cult members built them in the belief that the structures would attract transport aircraft full of cargo. Believers stage ‘drills’ and ‘marches’ with twigs for rifles and military-style insignia and ‘USA’ painted on their bodies to make them look like soldiers.” You see, the cult members had no idea how cargo was actually made and transported to their islands. Instead, they associated its appearance with the appearance of spiritual beings with magical equipment.

I chuckled a bit reading that because Alison is an excellent writer and it made me see in my mind’s eye little jungle men marching in faux-uniforms pretending to be air traffic controllers or soldiers and what-not.

The fallacy that induced the cargo-cults is mistaking correlation for causation. That is, because A happened and then B happened… A must have caused B. So if we repeat A, we should get result B.

Or in simpler terms, because ice cream sales go up when it is hot and sunny, let's sell more ice cream, because then we should have a warm, sunny day.

Full story...